Friday, 29 September 2017

PB4L: Positive Behaviour for Learning

Since being here at Omiston Primary School, I have been learning about how Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) works and what it looks like here. A learning coach from each habitat meets fortnightly as part of the PB4L team and discusses all areas of behaviour management and come up with strategies to keep it positive in our school.

According to the PB4L site on TKI it's a 'long term systematic approach involving ten initiatives'. They include: whole-school change initiatives, targeted group programmes, and individual support services.

We relate this approach to our school's vision principles: Curious, Collaborative, Capable and Connected. We divide the term that focus on: Learning, Playing, Meeting and Well-Being.


For example this term we had Curious Learning. On one week, during our hui (assemblies) will have a focus on Curious Learning and what that looks like. Then the following week in our whanau meetings, we go over the focus again and unpack and co-construct the language of the Matrix. We design activities for our learners to discuss and participate in, in smaller groups and with mixed year groups.

Our reward system is school wide. Here it is done by giving out 'Caught Being Oresome' tokens. If learners are awarded them, they then put these tokens into their whanau jars in their habitats. These are counted up weekly by our learner leaders. We also have special tokens that are worth "10 tokens" that are given out to learners to recognise their efforts.

Through this programme, we as educators are encouraged to keep things positive and have constructive worthwhile and long term interventions for our learners.

Monday, 7 August 2017

Inclusive Learning at OrmPS


Part of Educator Learning Time is to discuss and learn the importance of Inclusive Learning and we do this here at Ormiston Primary School.
Inclusive learning is all about equitable engagement and responsive approaches that ensure all of our learners are happy, safe and can access the learning experiences. - Diana Wilkes

Inclusive learning is ensuring ALL learners are included and provided engaging learning experiences which ensures each individual has opportunities for success and growth towards their learning goals.  - Karyn Patterson

Inclusive learning recognises that everyone learns differently and that these differences  should be catered for within a caring and supportive environment. - Lisa Pearson


Based on the discussion, as an educator it is important for us to ensure all learners are included and safe here at Ormiston Primary School.

Sunday, 6 August 2017

Shift in Pedagogy

Here at Ormiston Primary, as part of our daily delivery we have iExplore and iExperience. This is a new teaching aspect that I have learned since I have been here at Ormiston. 

In our team, iExplore happens in the morning from 9.05am - 9.45am. This is where we as learning coaches come up with ideas that our learners would be interested in learning about that are current and may be happening in our world. For example, we had a group that focused on making Jewellery to sell at the Ormiston Market Day. 

This group had to research ideas of what they would like to learn about, create and share. Within this big group, there were small groups. Some learners focused on making: necklaces, bracelets, headbands and hair clips. Once they created their products we had to think about how we were going to present and sell them. We also had to price our products and talked about what a profit meant.

In iExperience, I have designed, delivered and taught children a whole range of different inquiries which I hope has sparked thought and interest into their learning. Activities included: light, colour, Cook Island culture, science experiments, Samoan culture, Matariki, Waitangi Day, Easter and a whole range of other topics. We have taster sessions over two days, usually Monday and Tuesday. We have each hapu for 30-35 minutes. Then, the learners get a choice of what they would like to learn more about. So, they choose based on what the learning coaches have designed.

I've never taught inquiry topics like this before and this I think is a great way to learn. This has changed my pedagogy in the are of inquiry and teaching it based on our school's learning model. You can find out more on our Habitat Site here. iExplore here and iExperience here.

Tuesday, 6 June 2017

Problem Solving with Ian Stevens

Today we were fortunate enough to have professional development for Maths with Ian Stevens. Ian Stevens is from Maths Adventures. As a staff, we discussed and unpacked what 'Problem Solving' is. Here is a link to further in depth view of Problem Solving in the nzmaths site.

Ian showed and shared with us a lot of activities and games for me to try with my maths groups. A few activities that I would like to try are:

Activity
Roll 3 dice, add them
Roll 3 dice, organise them from smallest to biggest
Roll 3 dice and create the biggest number, create the smallest number
Roll 3 dice, add two - subtract one

Roll 3 dice, multiply two divide by one

Activity
2 dice
Add the numbers after rolling, if odd odd gets the point, if even even gets the point. Do this 10 times.
Pose the question: Is the game fair?
* Extend the game to multiplication
Is the game fair?

Games: Addition Love Bug Bump
6 Jun 2017 11:42:44.jpg

How to play: Roll three number cubes. Add those numbers. Cover that space with your counter. You can bump your partner’s counter if you roll the same number. If you roll one number twice you can put two counters on it, you lock that space and it can’t be bumped. The player to use all ten of their counters first is the winner.

Activity: Value of your name
Vowel: $150 Consonant: $60
Priscilla = $750

Make a word that equals $600
Can you find the most expensive word
Values of letters: A-1, B-2, C-3, D-4….etc

Thank you Ian for sharing your knowledge and activities with us. I will try these in the habitat and reflect on how they went. 

Monday, 5 June 2017

Vaiaso o le Gagana Sāmoa - Samoan Language Week

For the past 5 weeks, our Samoan girls dance group have been practicing their Samoan siva (dance). Samoan Language is the third most common language spoken in New Zealand, after English and Te Reo Maori. To find out more and access resources you can click here.

The girls practiced every week, sometimes more than twice a week to learn the actions and the song - Lau Samoa by Marina Davis. There are 15 girls in the group and only five of them are of Samoan descent. Well done to all the girls and we're looking forward to the next Pacific Island and Maori Language weeks coming up. Click here to find out more. Photo cred: Cassandra Everts.


Monday, 3 April 2017

Maths Warmups

Thinking back over the term and reflecting on my maths teaching and how my learners have progressed. Based on the learner's data from the end of last year, I grouped them accordingly. I have three maths groups.

We started the term with me teaching my hapu group number games like: Bowl a Fact and Rocket.
Bowl a Fact The first person to cross out all their numbers yells out "Strike" (like you would in bowling)



The other maths warm up game is: Rocket The person that fills in all their squares calls out "Blast Off". And they will need to call out their answers to check their numbers are in order from smallest 10 to biggest 67.


These warm up games will help with knowledge and can be played on paper or whiteboards. Enjoy!

Monday, 20 March 2017

Community Connections

Today in our staff meeting our focus is around Community Connections. We looked at the Kahakitia Accelerating Success 2013 - 2017 document. We read through page 37 and the main idea we gained from this, is that Maori students in the last decade have made massive improvement in achievements through explicit learning. On page 42 it also mentioned that making connections from schools, whanau, hapu and iwi are important and vital to student achievement in schools.



As a staff, we made a discussion spectrum. The statement was "Maori and Pasifika children need explicit teaching". Each learning coach was to stand in a position that represented their own point of view. One side being agree, the other end disagree and in the middle more a neutral opinion. It was interesting to see and hear the arguments bought forth. Lots of learning coaches had looked at the statement from a different point of view and some were quite passionate about how they looked at it. My personal view is, that I totally agree. Being of Pasifika descent but also to keep in mind that Pasifika and Maori students across New Zealand have the lowest levels of achievement.

What challenges can you see yourself as an educator moving forward with your learning today?
As a learning coach, some of the challenges that face will be to ensure that my teaching is explicit for all learners, keeping in mind the learners who are target learners. I'll need to go away and have a think about how I am going to integrate this in my hapu group and in our habitat. I'll be sharing on my blog what works and what doesn't.